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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
and pakistan leads our overall policy efforts and we are supporting his efforts, ambassador grossman's efforts, to develop all of the different elements of our policies. >> tried to get him here but couldn't. >> okay. so, in other words, you aren't in a position really to answer my question? is that what you're saying? >> yes, senator. i would defer to the special representatives office. >> then would you since the question is to you would you get me a written answer to the question? >> i will, sir. >> thank you. mr. harrigan, what are dea's plans for continued operations should military forces draw down to levels that would not allow adequate support for your operations? >> well, again, co-chairman grassley, i have been in discussions really for the last 18 months with my counter part at the podium here, mr. wechsler, as well as our regional director in afghanistan with the u.s. military and si isaf forces. dea has no intention of drawing down any of our 81 personnel. it would be a bit premature to see right now how the drawdown will impact dea but let me assure you we continue to work with t
pakistan's failure to act against militant extremists like the network in the north, the afghan taliban and other militant extremists. we will be interested in hearing general dempsey's thoughts on how to get the pakistan military to go after terrorist groups finding sanctuary in pakistan's tribal regions. al qaeda and the arabian peninsula in yemen and al qaeda elements in somalia continue to take advantage of failing and failed states to train their operatives and to plan attacks against the united states and our interests. it is critical that we don't apply significant pressure to these terrorist organizations, and to work with governments and international organizations in the region to address the long term problems. iran remains probably the greatest risk to world peace and to regional stability. we share the concerns of many nations about iran's continued support of terrorist activities beyond its borders, development of its missile programs, and refusal to cooperate with the international atomic energy commission. while we've seen evidence that the international sanctions has pu
pipeline, iran-pakistan-india. the u.s. state department stood up and said, this is not going to happen. does it go through anyway as a litmus test? >> i think what was unfortunate is the problem between india and pakistan, that they didn't want -- on continuedian side to rely on the gas on going through pakistan. they thought maybe it should be offshore and so on. i think as far as iran and pakistan is concerned or the two are concerned, the deal is going quite a long way ahead on the iranian side. on the pakistani side there is so many announcements. of course, over 20 years, announcements are announcements, but they seem a bit more serious. >> pipeline politics indeed. it's become a major source of contention between lebanon and israel. they're warning israel to stay away from the country's energy resources but leaders of the hezbollah group calls on them for an energy exploration. maritime dispute over who owns what are escalating already heightened tensions between two countries. we take a special look. >> reporter: under the warm waters of the mediterranean may lie treasures yet u
aid to pakistan. they're with holding it, expelling military trainers and they hope holidaying back all that money will make pakistan crack down harder on militants and terrorists. what's the best way to describe the relationship with pakistan right now? >> they've been an important ally in the fight on terrorism, they've been the victim of enormous amounts of terrorism, but right now they have taken steps that have given us reason to pause on aid which we have give on the their military and we're trying to work through that. it's a complicated relationship in a difficult part of the world. >>> and here's a figure for you. $37 billion. according to them, that much money could vanish this year from pockets. two out of ten dollars americans took in came in the form of money from government and when those extended benefits go away by the end of the year, some $37 billion onto go into people's accounts and hence won't go into the economy. let e let's go to kristie lu stout for your morning hit from hong kong. christy good morning. >> good morning, ali. >> it begins after hours markets c
, to look beyond just india, pakistan, afghanistan. and i think, you know, it's the right way to approach it. it wasn't too explicit, but it was a way of nudging them, saying, come on, guys, you've got to keep an eye on what's going on in asia right now. >> let's explore deeper. let's stay on the china part. you note she has to be careful, but she was also pretty obvious. she was talking about india's democracy and growing economy, and india can, quote, inspire others to follow a similar path of openness and tolerance. it's not hard to guess what she's talking about openness and tolerance, who is she talking about there? >> look, i think that this is a grand tradition of american diplomacy which is when we want to have a strategic relationship with china, we want to have a cooperative relationship with china but we do have our preferences and we've always said, every president, democrat and republican, for 30, 40 years, that, you know, when compared with dictatorships and closed systems, we prefer democracies and open systems. and so we're trying to make that association and make it plain. y
that have fallen -- followed the killing of osama bin laden in pakistan and the more recent mumbai attacks that have again refocused indian attention on terrorism. but terrorism is an issue which is not exactly an issue of full convergence between the u.s. and india. there are differences between the countries. when hillary clinton discusses this issue with her indian counterpart, there will certainly be differences that will need to be sorted out. >> very briefly, tell us how america's approach to india changed with the rise of china. this is something you've written about. >> china is an important factor, but not one that is publicly discussed. but it is a subtext in the u.s.- india relationship. china becomes more and more assertive as it picks territorial fights with india and its other neighbors, and also begins to exert its influence in the south china sea, claiming the south china sea to be part of its historical borders and thereby infringing on u.s. interests in that seat. there is great room for u.s. and indian collaboration in insuring peace, stability, and more in asia. >> we w
detaining a new subject. >>> the commission in pakistan that is investigate the u.s. raid that killed osama bin laden has told the pakistani government not to allow his residence to leave without permission. they were ready to send one of bin laden wives to her native country of yemen. several of their wives have been detained. the commission is looking into how osama bin laden was able to remain hidden in pakistan and the circumstances surrounding the u.s. raid. >>> time now 6:18. more than 1400 california state employees were paid more than $200,000 last year. now this report says 790 of those were doctors, dentists or nurses at prisons. total compensation can be pushed higher by payouts for unused vacation and sick time. for example is a prison doctor was paid $77,000. a dentist was paid $599,000. >>> alameda county may soon offer new help to nonenglish speaking voters. they sued the county failing to train enough speakers to serve as poll workers. the justice department also alleged the county did not translate enough ballots into other languages. the county and feds have reached a sett
pakistan's minister for minorities condemned the blasphemy law, militants executed him in broad daylight. in egypt, as the gentleman from new jersey has stated, 23 men, women and children were killed in a bombing at an alexandria church in egypt on new year's eve, just last may, treekists attacked christians at a church in cairo, leaving 12 dead and hundreds wounded. we are fortunate -- i wish these were isolated cases but i could provide countless other examples from afghanistan to india to saudi arabia. we're fortunate to live in a country that was founded by religious refugees on principles of tolerance. but it is important that we do everything we can to ensure that religious minorities elsewhere in the world enjoy the freedoms and protections they deserve, the freedoms and protections enjoyed by all americans, appointing this special envoy will be an important step in that direction and i urge my colleagues to support this bill. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. smith: i yield such time
or the hindus in pakistan, religious minorities have for centuries lived and worshiped alongside their muslim countrymen and women. unfortunately instability in the middle east has had a disproportionately negative impact on religious minorities, the most striking example of this has been in iraq where more than half of the iraqi christian population has been forced to flee the country since the invasion of iraq in 2003. those who have stayed have been specifically targeted in gruesome and random acts of violence, such as murder, rape and abduction. this includes religious and community leaders like archbishop rahall who has been kidnapped and murdered. religious minorities who have suffered attacks in their places of worship such as the october, 2010, massacre at our lady of salvation church in baghdad in which 58 worshipers were killed by militants and extremists. while the end of the mubarak regime in ejiment has brought about the promise for a -- in ejiment has brought about the promise for -- in egypt has brought about promise for religious reform, coptic christians have lived peacefully
and influenced china in term which influenced india which may be influencing pakistan. that same pattern may be beginning to happen in africa as we have some real success stories in other countries thinking if rwanda can do it, why can't we? >> we'll have to leave it at that. thank you very much. we will be right back. >> if i can finish now -- oh, yes, why don't you meow when i woman does that. between accoun, so your money can move as fast as you do. check out your portfolio, track the market with live updates. and execute trades anywhere and anytime the inspiration hits you. even deposit checks right from your phone. just take a picture, hit deposit and you're done. open an account today and put schwab mobile to work for you. >>> canada pulled the last of the combat troops out of afghanistan this week. this brings us to our question of the week. how many nations still have combat troops in afghanistan as part of the international security assistance force? is it a, 6, b, 16, c, 26 or d 46. stay tuned and we'll tell you the correct answer. go to cnn.com/gps for ten more questions. while yo
have to go to geneva, switzerland. the cheapest city to live in, we have to go to karachi, pakistan. they're about one-third cheaper than living in lowanda. >>> we have to go to break. >>> welcome back. you're watching "world business today" on cnn from rome and hong kong. >>> well, deals can be made, deals can be broken, then sometimes you just get lucky. euro millions is a lottery played across western europe. it week, the jackpot was worth the best part of $258 million. and just one lucky winner landed that windfall. unsurprisingly, they're keeping a low profile but we do know they're from the uk. and get this, the winnings are not taxed. there are no capital gains on this. it's all theirs to keep. that's really good luck. with so many state assets being sold off to help pay back europe's eye watering debt, we were wondering and trying to get creative. what could you buy with all of those millions? $9 million could buy you a private 1,000 acre island in greece. you'd be helping greece pay back some of the $400 billion that it owes. now, china has leased the container terminals at
and the kind of structure that we need to support going after al qaeda in pakistan and afghanistan -- that perhaps it is time to shut down $17 billion worth of money going to reconstruction projects when our track record really stings. i hope you all will convince me i am too cynical and angry and frustrated about the way we are spending money in theater. and i want to tell you, i am looking for good news and i hope we hear some today. there are too many people in missouri saying why can we fix this road, and then i look of the projects we are doing in afghanistan and it is very hard to explain to them why we can't fix that the road because we can't afford it -- yet we can throw money away in afghanistan on projects that were clearly not sustainable. and anybody spend any time thinking about it in the first place we would realize that. that kind of planning has to begin happening and that kind of accountability has to be present. senator portman is here. i will give him a time to get settled. we will continue the hearings and continue to provide oversight in this arena. it is a pla
and a narcotics trafficker. >>> to pakistan fresh steps the u.s. took to track down osama bin laden. the cia reportedly ran a phony vaccination project in abbottabad, part of a plan to gather dna to figure out if the bin laden family was there and the pakistani doctor suspected of running the operation is being detained. r re reza sayah what do you know. >> reporter: it's not clear but they need to confirm he was living and hiding out in abbottabad. the intelligence source tells us that this doctor staged a fake vaccination campaign and he was advertising free shots and free vaccinations for the kids in abbottabad. the british paper "the guardian" is reported he hired two nurses who went around house to house and the plan was to get to the bin laden kids, extract blood and use syringes to match their dna with bin laden's sister's dna who died in boston last year. we spoke with residents of abbottabad and six of them tell us they went to house to house offering free vaccinations. we hadn't verified if they went from compound to compound. >> unfortunately we're having some problems today with
in vietnam, and a lot of the ways of the fight now, the india- pakistan war which defines what is going on in the subcontinent now. even at the end of his career and of his life, 1994, he was still in the game. he was still thinking strategically, and to him, the cold war, the effects of the cold war still were not over. he was concerned about russia, and his thesis was communism is dead in warsaw, but democracy has not yet won, and for that reason he was traveling back and forth to russia, worried about whether gorbachev or yeltsin was speaking on that topic. he got a call from president clinton, they had a conservation -- conversation about clinton's russia policy, and you could see how his policy changed along with the advice that was given by richard nixon. as i see it, that is the essence of the man. i would like to conclude by going back to senator dole's look cheap. he talks about the last sign he saw president nixon, at a luncheon held in the capital honoring the 25th anniversary of his first inaugural. president nixon stood and delivered a speech, capturing the global seen as o
, the india-pakistan war, which still defiance in many ways what is going on in the subcontinent now. even at the end of his career, end of his life, in 1994, he was still in the game. he was still thinking strategically. to him, the cold war -- the effects of the cold war still were not over. he was concerned about russia. his basic thesis was communism is dead in russia, but democracy has not yet won. for that reason he was traveling back and forth to russia, worried about the leaders in russia, speaking on the topic. he gets a call from president palin ton. they had a conversation about clinton's russia policy. you can see in the squept months clinton russian policy change along the advice that was given by richard nixon. that is, as i see it, the essence of the man. i would like to conclude by going back to senator dole's eulogy. he talks about the last time he saw president nixon at a luncheon held in the capital honoring the 25th anniversary of his first inaugural. without a note, president nixon stood and delivered a compelling speech, captures the global scene and sharing his visio
of the wars in afghanistan and pakistan. >> still not getting serious. >> i went away from fuzzy. >> is that like jerry at trick math? >> yes. >> are you surprised they don't have a deal today? i actually really -- i mean, i really thought -- >> i would be shocked if they don't have a deal in the next two or three days. again, republican freshmen may have a big ideology difference with barack obama and his world view, and the divide is no greater than ronald reagan's was with tip o'neal in 1983 when they sat down, and they did a kneel. yes, you differ with barack obama and the democrats, but -- >> usually you are good at seeing somebody's angle. like you know what their angle was. what is the angle here? i don't get it. >> these republicans believe this is their only opportunity -- >> are they so stuck to the contract with the tea party they cannot think outside the box for the good of the country? seriously? >> can i finish? you asked a question and i need to finish. they understand one thing. >> what do they understand? >> they are dead right about this. this is their best chan
and to use their ability to destabilize the government of pakistan. >> have you met world leaders? what is your impression of them? >> i have that world leaders, and i do not worry about what i think of them. i do not believe that that is what is important. i look at the strategic interests of the united states and our allies and how this nation can either mutually cooperate or mutually conflict. >> finish the sentence -- "the state of the country today is what?" >> an opportunity waiting to be seized. >> why has it not been seized? because a lot of institutions such as the government and big banks have failed us, and i think the crushing weight of the government and the crushing weight of the failure of the financial markets have had -- have helped to inhibit the american people to move forward. it is not the american people. that is not what we are in a stagnating economy. it is the failure of governments to affect larger institutions. again, for a time, when you hear that something is too big to fail, they already have, and they continue to fail the people of the united states and co
about fraud in afghanisn, iraq, pakistan, and now the congress wants us, after giving away our jobs, not fair trade, free trade agreements -- now they want to go back and give them away with korea. i cannot believe the direction that this country has gone in. we keep talking about corporate tax rates. that is the key word. "rate." they are notaying 35%. they are paying 4%, 6%, 9 and i am making up the difference. the irs is after a relative of mine who lost their job. they owe them $5,000. karzei and his brother have walked off with billions of dollars and our congress cannot seem to stop it. guest: well, there is a lot there. obviously, a lot of these countries, and it is very disappointing to see fraud and hopefully over time it will go down, i do not want to make any excuses for it because there are no excuses for that activity. a lot of these countries do not have the same developed a rule of law that we have over here. even in our country, there have been instances of fraud and bribery and things like that. there were huge problems in its new jersey and in the past. in illinois
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)